Review: We Come Apart – Sarah Crossan & Brian Conaghan

img_4609Title: We Come Apart
Author: Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan
Publisher: Bloomsbury
Publication date: 9 February 2017
Genre: YA Contemporary
Pages: 336

After falling for Sarah Crossan’s beautiful One last month, I knew I had to get my hands on a copy of We Come Apart. Despite very high hopes, it did not disappoint. This is (quite literally) a stunning book that will find its way into the hearts of teenagers and adults alike.

Written entirely in verse and with a dual narrative, it tells the story of Jess and Nicu who meet while taking part in a reparation scheme to avoid getting a criminal record. Jess has a troubled home life and is struggling to find her place in the world, and Nicu, a Romanian immigrant, is working hard to make England his home while his parents attempt to raise enough money for him to marry a woman he has never met back in Romania.

The way this book has been marketed set me up for a simple love story and I could never have predicted the turn it took. Tackling domestic abuse, gang violence and prejudices against the Roma community, it is a timely, important book. I hope it is read and discussed widely in schools; I can imagine it having a long-lasting impact in the way Robert Swindells’ Daz 4 Zoe did for me when I was 14.

With very few words, this book makes a powerful impact. Towards the end I found myself having to put the book down to take a breath. I felt sick with fear, panicked and devastated all in the space of fifty pages, but I am so pleased this book exists. It’s a testament to where we are with YA today and the power it can have. I can’t wait to hear how people react.

Have you read We Come Apart? If so, let me know your thoughts in the comments below!

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